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protest music

What
Why
Where....?

Protest, musical or other, is always relative.

In some societies, the very act of playing music may constitute a protest (especially if women are the players). A mild joke in one place could be a death sentence in another. But often it depends on location. Music in a concert hall or upstairs room of a pub might be acceptable - people might even pay for tickets - but the same music outside or inside a military base , courtroom or corporate corridor could be a protest.

Then there is content. Sometimes protest music reflects the views of a dissenting minority - it is shared solidarity and respect - part of creating community - ( peace movements, lesbian and gay, ecological....) Sometimes it may express the opinions or aspirations of a disheartened or disenfranchised majority who need a common, public voice ( South African township music, music from occupied Palestine....) Sometimes it captures a moment or period in history that many people relate to, then and subsequently - the recordings of Bob Dylan are still played in bedrooms and sitting rooms....



In a consumer culture everything becomes commodified - one year peace is fashionable, the next, cancelling international debt. Commercialism and concern become confused together - often disturbingly so.

So what is creative dissent?

Reclaim public space - land that has been colonised by corporations, state, or the military - the commons, a place for people to meet / interact / recreate / reconfigure - Reclaim imagination - free our minds from commercial jingles / corporate propaganda / political spin and lies Reclaim creativity - something that belongs to all - so many daily acts of individual and group creativity go unrecognised Reclaim culture - not ' western civilisation', ( or 'eastern civilisation' or any nation)but a space of merging, mingling, in- and out-flowing of tunes and ideas, thoughts, desires, dreams, debates

See the events page for upcoming protest-type events
(continuous) - womens' street band

all content © Camilla Cancantata unless otherwise noted